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FASEB Urges Members to Oppose Proposed FY 2005 Budgets; NIH Spending Would be Lower than Bush s Budget

NEW YORK, May 7 (GenomeWeb News) - The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology yesterday sent an e-mail alert to its members urging them to oppose the FY 2005 budget resolutions passed by the two houses of the US Congress.

 

FASEB, which is composed of members of 22 scientific societies numbering over 65,000 US scientists, includes members of the American Society of Human Genetics and the American Physiological Society, which publishes the journal Physiological Genomics.

 

US President George Bush's budget proposal, which included a 2.6 percent increase for the National Institutes of Health, already came under fire two weeks ago from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The budget proposed by the House of Representatives would provide $1.6 billion less than the President's budget and the Senate's would provide $2.3 billion less. A budget conference committee will attempt to resolve the differences between the House and Senate, but the resulting compromise is still expected to be lower than Bush's budget, according to FASEB.

 

"We are at a critical point in the budget process ... and we have one last chance to make our voices heard," FASEB president Robert Wells said in the e-mail alert.

 

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