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DOE Awards $92M to Six Genomic, Proteomic Projects to Study Microbes

NEW YORK, Oct. 4 (GenomeWeb News) - The Department of Energy has awarded a total of $92 million to six collaborative research projects under its Office of Science's Genomics GTL research program, DOE said yesterday.

 

The six projects, involving 75 senior scientists at 21 institutions, aim to better understand microbes and microbial communities.

 

The following projects will receive funding:

 

n      Genome-Based Models to Optimize In Situ Bioremediation of Uranium and Harvesting Electrical Energy from Waste Organic Matter, led by the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, will receive $21.8 million over five years;

 

n      Proteogenomic Approaches for the Molecular Characterization of Natural Microbial Communities, led by the University of California, Berkeley, will receive $10.5 million over five years;

 

n      Dynamic Spatial Organization of Multi-Protein Complexes Controlling Microbial Polar Organization, Chromosome Replication, and Cytokinesis, led by Stanford University, will receive $17.9 million over five years;

 

n      High Throughput Identification and Structural Characterization of Multi-Protein Complexes During Stress Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris, led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, will receive $25.8 million over five years;

 

n      Molecular Assemblies, Genes, and Genomics Integrated Efficiently, led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, will receive $12.9 million over five years; and

 

n      An Integrated Knowledge Resource for the Shewanelle Federation, led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will receive $3 million over three years.

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