Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Daniel O Day Replaces Heiner Dreismann as Head of Roche Molecular Dx; Paul Gilna to Lead CAMERA Project; Alec Jeffreys to Receive Heineken Prize; New Board Members at Sigma; and Others

NEW YORK, May 8 (GenomeWeb News) - Daniel O'Day has replaced Heiner Dreismann as head of Roche Molecular Diagnostics, Roche said last week. O'Day most recently served as head of operations for Roche Pharmaceuticals in Denmark.

 

As head of Roche Molecular Diagnostics, O'Day will be responsible for all global functions including research, development, manufacturing, and marketing, as well as site operations in Pleasantonand Alameda, Calif.; Branchburg and Belleville, NJ; and Penzberg, Germany.  

 

O'Day holds a BS in biology from GeorgetownUniversityand an MBA from ColumbiaUniversity.

 


Paul Gilna has been appointed executive director of the Community Cyberinfrastructure for Advanced Marine Microbial Ecology Research and Analysis (CAMERA) project, HPC Wire reported last week. CAMERA is a joint project between the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, the J. Craig Venter Institute, the Universityof California, San Diego's Center for Earth Observations and Applications based at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and the San DiegoSupercomputerCenter.

 

Gilna replaces interim director Peter Arzberger, director of Life Science Initiatives at UCSD, HPC Wire reported. Gilna is the former director of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and group leader of genomic science and computational biology in the bioscience division of Los Alamos National Laboratory. He was previously program director for Computational Biology and Database Activity Programs at the National Science Foundation, and was also co-PI of the GenBank project at Los Alamos before it was managed by the NationalCenterfor Biotechnology Information.

 


Alec Jeffreys, a professor in the department of genetics at the University of Leicester and the inventor of DNA fingerprinting, will be awarded the 2006 H.P. Heineken Prize for Biochemistry and Biophysics by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 

The Heineken Prize, worth $150,000, is one of six prizes in the sciences and the arts to be awarded on Sept. 28, 2006, during a special session of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in Amsterdam.

 

In a statement, the academy said, "The consequences of Jeffreys' discovery have been so far-reaching and rapid that it is virtually impossible to imagine the world without it."

 

The discipline of forensic molecular biology "is therefore a direct outcome of Jeffreys' research," the academy noted, "but his discoveries have also opened up other doors, for example the ability to determine whether someone is a carrier of certain pathogenic genes."

 

Jeffreys is currently studying how irradiation may have caused genetic mutations in families from Chernobyl.

 

Last year Jeffreys was awarded the Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research. Other awards and honors include the Davy Medal by the Royal Society in 1987, a Knighthood for services to genetics in 1994, the Australia Prize in 1998, and the Louis-Jeantet Prize for Medicine in 2004.

 

Jeffreys received his PhD in biochemistry in 1975 at OxfordUniversity. He did his post-doctoral research at the Department of Medical Enzymology and Molecular Biology at the Universityof Amsterdam, and joined the Universityof Leicesterin 1977.

 


Protedyne has tapped Roch Kelly as chief operating officer. Kelly will head the company's manufacturing, purchasing, customer care, and human resources departments.

 

Kelly was most recently vice president of clinical operations, North Americaand worldwide business operations, for Paraxel International. Prior to that, he was executive director of manufacturing operations at Chiron Diagnostics.

 

He holds a BS in Finance from MiamiUniversityand an MBA from SyracuseUniversity.

 


Sigma-Aldrich re-elected several directors at its annual shareholders meeting last week: Nina Fedoroff, David Harvey, Lee McCollum, Jai Nagarkatti, Avi Nash, William O'Neil, Pedro Reinhard, Timothy Sear, Dean Spatz, and Barrett Toan.

 


PharmaFrontiers has hired Lynne Hohlfeld as vice president of finance. Hohlfield was previously vice president and chief financial officer of Denota Ventures and has also worked at Bacterial Barcodes, Spectral Genomics, LifeCell, Dixie Chemical, Price Waterhouse Coopers, McKenna & Company, and Arthur Andersen.

 

Hohlfeld holds a BBA in accounting from the Universityof Wisconsin, Madison.

 


Remco van Soest has joined Eksigent Technologies as product manager of the company's NanoLC HPLC systems. In this role, he will lead development of tools for proteomics and biomarker discovery, and will be responsible for marketing the company's NanoLC-1D Plus and NanoLC-2D proteomics systems.

 

Most recently, van Soest was technical manager at Dionex. Prior to that, he was research scientist at LC Packings. He holds an MS in analytical chemistry from Vrije Universiteit the Netherlands.

 


Promoted? Changing jobs? GenomeWeb News wants to know. E-mail us at [email protected] to announce your move in PEOPLE, a weekly roundup of personnel changes in the genomics industry.

The Scan

Interfering With Invasive Mussels

The Chicago Tribune reports that researchers are studying whether RNA interference- or CRISPR-based approaches can combat invasive freshwater mussels.

Participation Analysis

A new study finds that women tend to participate less at scientific meetings but that some changes can lead to increased involvement, the Guardian reports.

Right Whales' Decline

A research study plans to use genetic analysis to gain insight into population decline among North American right whales, according to CBC.

Science Papers Tie Rare Mutations to Short Stature, Immunodeficiency; Present Single-Cell Transcriptomics Map

In Science this week: pair of mutations in one gene uncovered in brothers with short stature and immunodeficiency, and more.