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Danaher Completes Acquisition of Genetix

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Danaher has completed its ₤63.4 million ($102 million) acquisition of imaging products firm Genetix, which will now operate as part of Danaher subsidiary Leica Microsystems.

Danaher had announced its 85 pence per share bid to acquire the New Milton, UK-based firm in December.

The acquisition will bring together Genetix's expertise in imaging systems and software for research purposes with Leica's microsopes and other life science instruments. The Genetix business will operate as a separate business unit within Leica, and its products will continue to be marketed and sold through existing channels, said Wetzlar, Germany-based Leica.

"Genetix' extensive expertise will be invaluable for us," Stefan Traeger, managing director of the life science division of Leica Microsystems, said in a statement. "Their software capabilities, specifically in analytical software, will help us to make progress in the area of virtual microscopy which is a field we have only recently stepped into. In addition, Genetix' experience and market leading products in cell biology and genetics will expand our reach into the drug discovery and development markets."

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