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Dakota Technologies Wins $750K SBIR Grant for High-Throughput Screening

NEW YORK, Sept. 10 (GenomeWeb News) - Dakota Technologies has received a $750,000 grant from the US National Institutes of Health to develop a multi-mode microplate reader and high-throughput screening assays based on the firm's fluorescence measurement technology, Dakota said recently.

 

Dakota, based in Fargo, ND, claims that by combining microchip laser sources with its transient digitizer, they can generate high quality fluorescence lifetime data, including time-resolved polarization, "much faster and at substantially lower cost than alternative approaches."

 

Dakota said the Phase II Small Business Innovation Research grant will help it "accelerate ... plans" to commercialize products for high-throughput and high-content screening in drug discovery.

 

The assays Dakota is developing "aim to overcome false positives caused by fluorescence interferences commonly encountered in high-throughput screening," the company said in a statement. Its lifetime measurement technique, which Dakota said "provides enhanced multiplexing capabilities," will also be used to develop assays that are suited to multi-parameter analysis.

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