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Cyntellect and Boston University Ink Research Pact

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Cyntellect said today that it will collaborate with the Boston University School of Medicine to research the role of mitochondrial oxidative damage in degenerative, aging, and metabolic diseases.

Under the agreement, BU scientists will use Cyntellect's LEAP cell-processing workstation to analyze, purify, and process cells within microplates.

Among the BU collaborators is Orian Shirihai, director of BU's Cell Imaging Core. Shirihai's research focuses on mitochondria and beta-cell function and dysfunction related to diabetes.

In a statement, Shirahai said that he and his colleagues will study two disease models – diabetes and anemia – in which oxidative damage to mitochondria play a key role in the development of pathology.

"Cyntellect's LEAP workstation will give us a valuable tool to advance our studies by adding unique cell processing capabilities within the context of a cell imaging system," Shirihai said in a statement.

Financial terms of the collaboration were not disclosed.

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