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Clinical Data Gains Broader Reimbursement Coverage for Long QT Syndrome Test

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) - Two private health insurers have added Clinical Data's genetic test for the heart disorder long QT syndrome to their reimbursement policies, the company said late last week.
 
The company did not disclose the names of the new insurers that have added the Familion LQTS test, which it offers through its PGxHealth division, but said these reimbursement policies will expand coverage for the test from around 49 million people as of the end of 2007 to around 65 million people.
 
The reimbursement coverage does not mean that all of these individuals are guaranteed access to the test, but that it would be covered in some cases.
 
Clinical Data said that the test also meets Blue Cross Blue Shield's criteria for LQTS diagnosis "in certain individuals."
 
The company noted that the test is also reimbursed by Medicare, and that its PGxHealth division is an approved Medicaid laboratory provider in 13 states.

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