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Celsis, Promega Team on ADME-Tox Assays

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Celsis In Vitro Technologies, a division of life science products and lab services firm Celsis International, today announced that it is collaborating with Promega on ADME-Tox assays for hepatocytes.

Baltimore-based Celsis IVT said that it will provide pre-qualified lots of its cryopreserved hepatocytes for use with Promega's bioluminescent ADME-Tox assays, including those used to study cytochrome P450 gene induction and inhibition and its GSH-Glo Glutathione assay for investigating mechanisms of hepatoxicity.

The companies believe that the collaboration will enable customers to quickly and easily identify and select products that have been validated to work together. The firms are currently collaborating on scientific presentations and publications demonstrating effective applications of the validated tools for ADME-Tox studies.

"Providing pre-qualified cryoplateable hepatocytes that work the first time and every time with our luminescent reagents has always been a goal for Promega," James Cali, lead scientist for ADME-Tox at Promega, said in a statement. "By validating lots from their extensive inventory in advance, Celsis IVT will help our customers save additional time in their research."

Financial and other terms of the collaboration were not disclosed.

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