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Bruker, HealthLinx File Patents for Biomarkers Linked to Pregnancy Risk

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) — Bruker Daltonics and HealthLinx have filed a joint PCT patent application to develop and market diagnostics based on their joint discovery of two biomarkers linked to pregnancy complications, HealthLinx said today.
 
The tests will be based on Bruker’s ClinProt test, but HealthLinx said it will retain the rights to any ELISA/multiplex tests developed from these patents in the future.
 
HealthLinx, based in Melbourne, Australia, said that the two companies will share marketing rights for the test in the US and in Canada, but will split the international rights.
 
Bruker will handle Europe, the UK, Africa, and South America, while HealthLinx will have rights in Asia, Australia, and New Zealand.
 
HealthLinx added that they plan to share the development and marketing costs.
 
The companies have been engaged in a research collaboration for the past year, and are working to complete the second phase of trials. The biomarkers they discovered and hope to patent may be used to diagnose women who are predisposed to pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, pre-term labor, miscarriage, and gestational diabetes.

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