Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Boehringer Ingelheim Gives $65M to JGU Mainz for Life Sciences

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz will receive €50 million ($65.4 million) over the next 10 years from the Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation to fund its life sciences activities, the university said on Friday.

The funding will go toward efforts to consolidate JGU's biology program around its Institute of Molecular Biology.

The IMB was established with €100 million in funding from the foundation in 2009, and now JGU said plans for this institute to serve as the basis of its biology activities and faculty.

The German university also said it has plans to construct a new biology research building using additional funding from the state government, JGU said, and to recruit new life sciences faculty members, with the specific aim of supporting young researchers.

IMB's current research efforts include studies involving developmental biology, epigenetics, DNA repair, and similar biomedical areas.

The institute's research capabilities include core facilities that provide services for next-generation sequencing, microarray analysis, bioinformatics, high-end microscopy, and cytometry.

The Scan

Team Tracks Down Potential Blood Plasma Markers Linked to Heart Failure in Atrial Fibrillation Patients

Researchers in BMC Genomics found 10 differentially expressed proteins or metabolites that marked atrial fibrillation with heart failure cases.

Study Points to Synonymous Mutation Effects on E. Coli Enzyme Activity

Researchers in Nature Chemistry saw signs of enzyme activity shifts in the presence of synonymous mutations in a multiscale modeling analysis of three Escherichia coli genes.

Team Outlines Paternal Sample-Free Single-Gene Approach for Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening

With data for nearly 9,200 pregnant individuals, researchers in Genetics in Medicine demonstrate the feasibility of their carrier screening and reflex single-gene non-invasive prenatal screening approach.

Germline-Targeting HIV Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase I Trial

A National Institutes of Health-led team reports in Science that a broadly neutralizing antibody HIV vaccine induced bnAb precursors in 97 percent of those given the vaccine.