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BioNanomatrix Gets $400K Grant to Continue Developing Single-Molecule Imaging Instrument

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – BioNanomatrix said today that its has received a $399,020 grant from the National Human Genome Research Institute to continue development of its nanoscale imaging platform for haplotyping and gene mapping.
 
The Philadelphia-based firm said the grant would fund a two-year project led by Ming Xiao to develop a nanoscale platform for single-molecule haplotyping imaging and analysis of long strands of DNA at ultra-high resolution in a massively parallel format.
 
The latest grant is the fourth received by the firm from the National Institutes of Health to develop the single-molecule analysis technology. Last September, BioNanomatrix and partner Complete Genomics were awarded an $8.8 million grant from the US National Institute of Standards and Technology to develop a high-throughput sequencing technology that they said will be able to sequence a human genome in eight hours for less than $100.
 
Han Cao, CSO of BioNanomatrix, said in a statement that the newest grant is “explicitly intended to support the development of a platform to produce consistent linearization and imaging of individual DNA molecules, allowing for high resolution mapping of labeled genomic sites. This added support will help us accelerate the development of the platform, which we believe could add significantly to the understanding of genetic diseases by increasing access to whole genome analysis and by allowing researchers to view and analyze the critical haplotype information that is currently difficult to obtain.”
 
BioNanomatrix said that the goal of the project is to develop a fully integrated nanochannel chip and reader that can conduct single-molecule mapping of linearized genomic material extracted from a sample, thereby enabling direct visualization and analysis of the DNA at high resolution.

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