Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Bio-Rad s Q1 Revenues Rise 3 Percent

NEW YORK, May 5 (GenomeWeb News) - Bio-Rad Laboratories yesterday reported first-quarter revenue of $308.3 million, a 3-percent increase over revenue of $299.2 million for the first quarter last year. On a currency-neutral basis, the firm's revenue rose 8.3 percent year over year.

 

Sales for its life science segment were up .5 percent, and 5.6 percent on a currency-neutral basis, to $144.8 million. According to the company, revenues rose on increased sales of amplification reagents and instrumentation, automated electrophoresis, and process chromatography products.

 

Bio-Rad's MJ Research unit resumed sales of its thermal cycler products during the quarter, following a settlement with Roche Molecular Diagnostics and Applera. Bio-Rad President and CEO Norman Schwartz noted during a conference call yesterday that the firm had resumed selling the thermal cycler with roughly six weeks left in the first quarter.

 

Sales for the company's clinical diagnostics segment rose 5.5 percent, or 10.9 percent excluding currency effects, to $160.3 million. The company credited the increase to growth in the blood typing, blood-virus screening, autoimmune testing, and diabetes monitoring product lines.

 

Bio-Rad's net income dropped 6.9 percent year over year to $31.2 million, or $1.19 per basic share, from $33.5 million, or $1.29 per share. Last year's Q1 results include $4 million, or $.15 per share in income from discontinued operations.

 

R&D spending climbed 4.9 percent to $28.1 million year over year.

 

As of March 31, Bio-Rad had cash and cash equivalents of $265.6 million.

The Scan

Interfering With Invasive Mussels

The Chicago Tribune reports that researchers are studying whether RNA interference- or CRISPR-based approaches can combat invasive freshwater mussels.

Participation Analysis

A new study finds that women tend to participate less at scientific meetings but that some changes can lead to increased involvement, the Guardian reports.

Right Whales' Decline

A research study plans to use genetic analysis to gain insight into population decline among North American right whales, according to CBC.

Science Papers Tie Rare Mutations to Short Stature, Immunodeficiency; Present Single-Cell Transcriptomics Map

In Science this week: pair of mutations in one gene uncovered in brothers with short stature and immunodeficiency, and more.