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Athersys Wins Diabetes Grant from JDRF

This article has been corrected. A previous version erroneously stated that the JDRF program had $600 million. The JDRF said it does not release the dollar figure on research funding available under its program. GenomeWeb regrets the error.

 

NEW YORK, June 4 (GenomeWeb News) - Cleveland, Ohio-based Athersys announced today that it has received a grant from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation to use its protein expression and stem cell technology to look for proteins that promote the formation of pancreatic islet cells.

 

The grant was provided as part of JDRF's Industry Discovery and Development Partnership Program. William Lehman, executive vice president, corporate development and finance of Athersys, said that the value of the grant was "in the six figures."

 

Athersys will use its RAGE protein expression technology with its MAPC adult stem cell technology to identify, isolate, and characterize proteins that cause the differentiation of stem cells into pancreatic islet cells.

 

Athersys has developed RAGE and GECKO - which stands for genome-wide cell-based knockout technology - for use in drug target validation and therapeutic development applications.

 

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