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ASI, BioDot Ink Deal Aimed at FISH, Karyotyping Analysis

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Applied Spectral Imaging and BioDot today announced an agreement to sell and market a genetic analysis solution combining technologies from both firms.

The new solution will directly link ASI's Genasis imaging and analysis instrument and BioDot's CellWriter automated dispensing system for fluorescent in situ hybridization and karyotyping. The new product "enables an end-to-end, automated workflow for FISH and karyotyping, from slide production to sample analysis, and result reporting," the companies said.

"The cytogenetics workflow is highly complex and by integrating automated slide processing with automated microscopy, we can now deliver a data management product that greatly simplifies the scientist's workday," Tom Tisone, CEO of BioDot said in a statement.

ASI is based in Carlsbad, Calif., and provides microscopy imaging solutions. Genasis is an automated imaging platform for genetic and pathological analysis. It is cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration for FISH clinical applications, such as ALK, UroVysion, HER2/neu, CEP XY, and karyotyping.

Irvine, Calif.-based BioDot is a supplier of tools for the research, development, and commercialization of diagnostic tests, it said.

Financial and other terms were not disclosed.

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