Ancient Genome Prompts Rethink of Timing of Evolutionary Events in Horse Lineage | GenomeWeb

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Horses, donkeys, and zebras may have split from a shared common ancestor much earlier than once suspected, a new genome sequencing study suggests.

As they reported online today in Nature, investigators at the University of Copenhagen, BGI-Shenzhen, and elsewhere sequenced genomic DNA from the fossilized remains of a horse believed to have lived in what's now the Yukon Territory of Canada as far back as 700,000 years ago or more.

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