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ABI to Lay Off 250 Staffers in R&D, Marketing, Operations; Plans to Hire Elsewhere

NEW YORK, June 23 (GenomeWeb News) - Applied Biosystems plans to lay off around 250 employees and close undisclosed facilities "primarily" R&D, marketing, and operations.

 

The move, part of ABI's ongoing reorganization, will cost the company between $20 million to $22 million in a pre-tax charge in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2005 to cover costs of employee severance and "facilities closure," ABI said in a statement.

 

It was not immediately clear when the lay-offs would take place. ABI's fourth quarter ends June 30.

ABI said the move will help the company "rebalance" its workforce. As such, ABI said it will hire additional staffers "in other functional areas including field sales and support, manufacturing quality, and advanced research" during fiscal 2006.

"These adjustments are in keeping with our program to enhance Applied Biosystems' performance and should better align our resources with the needs of our customers," said ABI president Catherine Burzik. "We expect these actions, which include augmenting and upgrading of skills in critical functions, will support higher levels of sales over time. ... "

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