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ABI Announces Plans to Introduce Whole-Genome Microarray

NEW YORK, July 22 - Applied Biosystems announced today it was entering the microarray fray, and would commercially introduce by the end of the year an array that includes probes for over 30,000 human genes on a single chip.

 

At present, no company has a mass-market microarray that incorporates the entire human genome on a single chip, although the market has been heading in that direction, with Affymetrix going from five-chip human genome sets to two-chip sets.

 

The company said the product, the Applied Biosystems Expression Array System, will incorporate 60-mer oligonucleotides, as well as a chemiluminescent detection system for hybridization rather than the flourophore dye systems used by most microarrays on the market.  It will also be packaged with a microarray analyzer, a database of gene and protein information, and reagents, according to company statements.

 

The gene probes for the array are derived from both the Celera and public genome databases, according to the company.

 

Applied Biosystems said it would ship the array product to customer test sites in the fall, and would also introduce arrays for the mouse genome in early 2004, and the rat genome afterwards.

 

This announcement comes just 16 hours before ABI's parent, Applera, was due to release its fiscal fourth quarter and end-of year financial results.

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