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At a mini-symposium on the genetic approaches to finding novel therapeutic targets for cancer, moderator Peter Lichter of the German Cancer Research Center said there has been success getting drugs into the clinic using genetic approaches. No matter where researchers start or where they end up, they usually follow a common strategy, Lichter said — genome-wide sequencing to indentify and prioritize candidate genes, and then functional studies of those candidates both in vitro and in vivo, with the goal of developing preclinical models for drug testing.

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According to Gizmodo, researchers have developed a list of a million nucleic acid-like polymers that could store genetic information.

An opinion piece in the Washington Post argues that golden rice could save the sight and lives of many children.

US National Institutes of Health has issued a new draft data-sharing policy, ScienceInsider reports.

In Cell this week: analysis of immune microenvironment in hepatocellular carcinoma, proteogenomic analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and more.