AACR Presentation Points to Gene, Environment Interaction that Modulates Lung Cancer Risk | GenomeWeb

WASHINGTON (GenomeWeb News) – A SNP in a dopamine receptor gene appears to interact with childhood exposure to secondhand smoke to modulate lung cancer risk, reported Bríd Ryan, a research fellow at the National Cancer Institute, during the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting yesterday.

Ryan and her colleagues hypothesized that SNPs found within genes associated with smoking behavior like DRD1, which is associated with nicotine addiction, could affect susceptibility to tobacco-related carcinogens and cancer risk.

Get the full story

This story is free
for registered users

Registering provides access to this and other free content.

Register now.

Already have an account?
Login Now.

In PNAS this week: diatom genetic diversity, microfluidic droplet method for single-cell screening, and more.

Scientific publishers are looking into whether artificial intelligence can help the peer-review process, Wired reports.

Researchers are using gene editing to develop more robust livestock and crops, AFP reports.

Researchers rally near the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Boston.

Mar
09
Sponsored by
Bio-Rad

This webinar will discuss how next-generation sequencing and digital PCR can be used in a complementary manner for liquid biopsies in order to improve patient care.

Mar
23
Sponsored by
Personal Genome Diagnostics

This webinar will discuss genomic methods to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to immuno-oncology (IO) therapies.

Mar
28

This webinar describes the optimization and validation of two commercially available next-generation sequencing assays that may be used to guide personalized cancer treatment.