WASHINGTON (GenomeWeb News) – A SNP in a dopamine receptor gene appears to interact with childhood exposure to secondhand smoke to modulate lung cancer risk, reported Bríd Ryan, a research fellow at the National Cancer Institute, during the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting yesterday.

Ryan and her colleagues hypothesized that SNPs found within genes associated with smoking behavior like DRD1, which is associated with nicotine addiction, could affect susceptibility to tobacco-related carcinogens and cancer risk.

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