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At the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology meeting this week, several MGI customers reported results from the DNBSeq-G400.

The DNBSeq Tx system, several of which are already up and running at the China National GeneBank, can churn out up to 100,000 human genomes per year.

The company is currently looking for beta customers to test the system for whole-genome sequencing, exome sequencing, and RNA-seq library prep workflows.

The Cambridge, Massachusetts-based firm also said it tacked on $3 million to its Series B financing round for a total of $30 million.

The company plans to offer four new products by the end of the year, including four targeted transcriptomic panels and IHC compatibility for Visium.

The Telomere-to-Telomere consortium has already generated a gapless assembly of the human X chromosome and aims to complete all chromosomes over the next two years or so.

Early-access users have used IDT's rhAmpSeq technology to create genetic marker maps for plants and to validate off target events in gene editing.

 

Five early customers are currently operating the Sequel II, which promises an eightfold increase in throughput, making reference genome sequencing feasible.

The company is working on nanopore technologies for sensing or sequencing applications, which it aims to commercialize through a partner.

At the AGBT conference, MGI Tech showcased its technologies, while a Sanger Institute researcher presented results from a comparison between BGI and Illumina data.

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The Wall Street Journal reports on gaps in COVID-19 testing affecting less affluent urban areas and rural locations.

According to NBC News, new SARS-CoV-2 variants are making it harder for researchers to model the course of the pandemic.

The New York Times reports that experts say President Joe Biden's goal of vaccinating 1 million people a day in the US in the next 100 days is too low a bar.

In Science this week: single-cell lineage tracing technique applied to study lung cancer metastasis, and more.