The so-called ACT sheets are one pagers that guide doctors on what to do after receiving a genetic test results for a patient. 

At the ACMG annual conference in Phoenix last week, several labs and companies discussed their efforts in healthy genome sequencing.

Using monogenic diabetes registry examples, a University of Chicago researcher argued that appropriate genetic testing is needed to detect monogenic diabetes.

The organization cited ethical concerns and technological limitations surrounding CRISPR and other gene-editing approaches.

The group published a position statement today advocating for "extensive" sharing of lab and clinical data in order to improve treatment of patients.

The recommendations were developed by a working group of the AMP Clinical Practice Committee that included representatives from ACMG, ASCO, and CAP.

An ACMG workgroup has added four new genes, removed one gene, and said it would open up the nomination process to the broader community and consider PGx genes.

In a new AMP working group project, labs can volunteer to compare their interpretation of challenging variants to help identify where and how the guidelines might be improved.

The revisions, which are subject to approval by the ACMG board of directors, will likely involve the addition of five genes and the removal of one gene from the list.

The foundation, which was established by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, will use the money to fund fellows' salaries and research.


Robert Redfield is floated as the next director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Washington Post reports.

The New York Times writes that the National Institutes of Health's All of Us Research Program is "ambitious" and that some are concerned it might be overly so.

Representative Lamar Smith's criticism of the National Science Foundation has "changed the nature of the conversation," according to ScienceInsider.

In PLOS this week: non-coding RNA function in yeast, transcriptomic profiles of malaria parasites, and more.