ACMG | GenomeWeb

ACMG

The organization cited ethical concerns and technological limitations surrounding CRISPR and other gene-editing approaches.

The group published a position statement today advocating for "extensive" sharing of lab and clinical data in order to improve treatment of patients.

The recommendations were developed by a working group of the AMP Clinical Practice Committee that included representatives from ACMG, ASCO, and CAP.

An ACMG workgroup has added four new genes, removed one gene, and said it would open up the nomination process to the broader community and consider PGx genes.

In a new AMP working group project, labs can volunteer to compare their interpretation of challenging variants to help identify where and how the guidelines might be improved.

The revisions, which are subject to approval by the ACMG board of directors, will likely involve the addition of five genes and the removal of one gene from the list.

The foundation, which was established by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, will use the money to fund fellows' salaries and research.

In a pilot study published in AJHG, nine labs initially agreed for only 34 percent of variants, but for 71 percent after discussing the evidence and use of guidelines in detail.

For many patients, the diagnosis led to a change in medical care or management, averted additional diagnostic tests, and facilitated family planning.

A genetic testing utilization service launched by Stanford in 2015 helped cut the number of inappropriately ordered tests in half and saved about $250,000 during the first year.

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In PLOS this week: a sequencing-based screen of Lyme disease-causing pathogen, the range of animals bitten by Anopheles darling mosquitoes in Peru, and more.

An NC State researcher is exploring the use of CRISPR-Cas3 as an anti-microbial, Gizmodo reports.

The Earth BioGenome Project plans to sequence all life on Earth, according to ScienceInsider.

For those who are concerned about Trump administration actions related to science, a new column in Scientific American has suggestions for ways to fight back.