About 77 percent of the species the researchers uncovered in a human microbiome study of more than 9,000 metagenomes had never before been described.

MSK researchers showed that high TMB may be associated with improved survival across tumor types, but the cut-offs for high and low status will vary based on histology.

The new, multinational iReceptor Plus Consortium will develop a platform for sharing of AIRR-seq data to advance immunotherapy and precision medicine.

The firm's has expanded its ctDNA sequencing test to cover 17 genes, enough to provide a readout of microsatellite instability for guiding cancer immunotherapy use.

Kansas State University's Barbara Valent outlined genomics research underway to combat a fungal pathogen with the potential to seriously compromise wheat production.

An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.

The Economist reports on Synthorx's efforts to use expanded DNA bases they generated to develop a new cancer drug.

Dec
06
Sponsored by
MNG Laboratories

Join MNG Laboratories' Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Peter L. Nagy, and the Clinical Reporting Team as they present multiple case studies illustrating the value of using complementary testing and data analysis methods to increase the clinical sensitivity of MNG’s genetic testing portfolio. The team will highlight cases solved through the application of high resolution CNV assessment, mitochondrial DNA analysis, transcriptome/RNA sequencing, and repeat expansion screening from genome sequencing datasets. After the presentation, there will be a 15 minute Q&A with our speakers. 

Breakthrough UV-C Performance Enables Better Control for Lab Managers

This white paper makes the case for why UV LED technology deserves serious consideration by RNA sequencing labs for controlling ribonuclease in a laboratory setting. It describes Phoseon’s findings related to LED light engines for the inactivation of RNases in a laboratory setting.

Clinical laboratories are increasingly adopting molecular assays as an alternative to the tedious, time-consuming stool cultures that have long been the mainstay for testing patients who might have infectious diarrhea or conditions such as Salmonella or Campylobacter. With an estimated 1.7 billion cases of childhood diarrheal disease occurring annually around the world, this is a significant advance for gastroenteritis testing.