Genome & Genetics News from GenomeWeb

Going forward, Complete Genomics will focus on clinical research and support BGI's noninvasive prenatal testing business as well as the launch of its benchtop sequencer in China.

Yakutian horse

Horses in the Siberian Far East appear to have been introduced by the Yakut population within the last several hundred years, adapting to the environment since then.

Cigna worked with InformedDNA to come up with scenarios under which it would cover whole-exome sequencing, although it still considers whole-genome analysis investigational.

Springboarding from his successful crowdfunding campaign, synthetic biologist Josiah Zayner wants to bring molecular biology into everyone's living room.

The Hologic-funded model predicted co-testing would lead to a lifetime savings of $39 per woman, with high cancer detection sensitivity and fewer false positive results.

Through comprehensive genomic profiling, researchers identified molecular events that cause lower grade gliomas to progress to more deadly forms of brain cancer.

Using available turtle genome sequences, researchers found expansions and relocations to epidermal differentiation genes that appear to contribute to shell formation.

San Diego-based Cypher Genomics has been offering human genome interpretation software. The company's 14 employees will join Human Longevity.

In PLOS this week: transcriptional and translational study of human cytomegalovirus interactions with host cells, spider web DNA study, and more.

The New York Stem Cell Foundation signs a lease for a new space.

Researchers gear up for an international meeting to discuss the ethics of gene editing.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: personal genome approach to RNA-seq read alignment, hematopoietic Systems Biology Repository, and more.

Sponsored by
National Center for Biotechnology Information

This webinar highlights important features and demonstrates the practical aspects of using the NCBI BLAST service.

Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is maturing as a technology, becom­ing the central platform and gold standard for much of the molecular research and molecular diagnostics performed today. Behind this success is the field’s increasing awareness of the importance of quality control, validation, and performance assessment.

Lucigen has developed an NGS library technology that generates 20 kb mate pair reads that jump across repetitive elements found in microbial genomes (, which dramatically improves the success of assembly de novo by resolving repeat elements and ordering contigs. Six microbial genomes have been assembled de novo and completely closed and finished using Lucigen’s NxSeq® 20 kb mate pair library kit, a companion fragment library, and SPAdes assembly software.