With choice, real-time interpretation, low pricing, and education, Helix believes it may have cracked the formula for integrating genomics into people's daily lives.

The release has been accompanied by acute interest from the genomics community, which views the resource as a "game changer" for anyone working in human genetics.

Scientists reported this week for the first time a Danish reference genome based on the de novo assembly of 150 genomes from 50 family trios.

A settlement would have prevented Qiagen from selling its GeneReader in the US, but the firm now offers an upgraded version of its chemistry.

Stakeholders increasingly highlight the need for better, more standardized tools to validate and compare liquid biopsy tests, and commercial firms have responded.

Investigators developed a pooled method for simultaneously sequencing RNA in bulk sets of samples being profiled by high-throughput screening assays.

CNBC reports that Amazon invested in the startup Grail as it sees an opportunity for its cloud computing company in genomics.

Lawrence Krauss writes at Slate that science is needed for good public policy and should not be ignored.

Researchers are working on re-making the yeast genome from scratch, according to the Associated Press.

In Cell this week: functional profiling of Plasmodium genome, a self-inactivating rabies virus, and more.

Whatever practices you use for NGS assay development, validation, and performance monitoring, your goal is the same: Your results must be as accurate, precise, and consistent as possible.

That goal is within reach. And in this paper, we’ll show you how. By reading this white paper, you will learn:

· Why quality control is so challenging for NGS labs

· How reference materials may be the key to quality control

· The 9 key characteristics of sufficient NGS reference materials

· How to use QC metrics to monitor the health of your NGS assays

What’s been holding back more widespread adoption of liquid biopsy testing?

Lack of adequate circulating tumor DNA reference materials for developing and measuring safe, accurate and reproducible assays has been a challenge for clinical labs

Liquid biopsies are poised to revolutionize cancer diagnosis and therapy, but until now, advances in diagnostic technology - particularly at the low end of the sample input and sensitivity spectrum - have been hampered by the lack of ability of labs to reproducibly measure and assess the assay’s performance.