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Ambry researchers recently published a study suggesting that roughly 40 percent of genetic variants reported in raw data from DTC genetic tests may be wrong.

Abbott said that the MDx platform offers a number of initial assays, including tests for HIV-1, HBV, and HCV, among others.

Early-access users of the Flongle said the small, inexpensive flow cells allow them to develop new methods quickly and to check the quality of clones and libraries.

The agriculture company said it will use the technology it has licensed for new applications in crop editing and for research to bring new foods to market.

The company — a spinout of the New York Genome Center — said it will use the funding in part to develop its technologies for new applications in agriculture.

Nature News reports that researchers in Japan hope to soon test the use of reprogrammed stem cells to treat damaged corneas.

A new approach may help limit the number of fish that are mislabeled at markets or restaurants, according to New Scientist.

At Slate, the R Street Institute's Nila Bala discusses the privacy rights of suspects that genetic genealogy approaches in law enforcement bring up.

In PNAS this week: numerous mobile genetic elements contribute to Vibrio cholerae drug resistance, troponin I mutations in sudden infant deaths, and more.

Dec
06
Sponsored by
MNG Laboratories

Join MNG Laboratories' Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Peter L. Nagy, and the Clinical Reporting Team as they present multiple case studies illustrating the value of using complementary testing and data analysis methods to increase the clinical sensitivity of MNG’s genetic testing portfolio. The team will highlight cases solved through the application of high resolution CNV assessment, mitochondrial DNA analysis, transcriptome/RNA sequencing, and repeat expansion screening from genome sequencing datasets. After the presentation, there will be a 15 minute Q&A with our speakers. 

Breakthrough UV-C Performance Enables Better Control for Lab Managers

This white paper makes the case for why UV LED technology deserves serious consideration by RNA sequencing labs for controlling ribonuclease in a laboratory setting. It describes Phoseon’s findings related to LED light engines for the inactivation of RNases in a laboratory setting.

Clinical laboratories are increasingly adopting molecular assays as an alternative to the tedious, time-consuming stool cultures that have long been the mainstay for testing patients who might have infectious diarrhea or conditions such as Salmonella or Campylobacter. With an estimated 1.7 billion cases of childhood diarrheal disease occurring annually around the world, this is a significant advance for gastroenteritis testing.