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Qiagen shareholders tendered only 47 percent of the firm's issued and outstanding shares by Monday's deadline, short of the two-thirds minimum needed to complete the deal.

The company has taken an exclusive license to the Casɸ proteins and is working to characterize their capabilities to determine how they can best be used.

The sequencing firm is offering 19.4 million shares of common stock at $4.47 per share and plans to use the proceeds for product launches, among other uses.

The company priced about 6.6 million shares of its common stock at $19 per share, and is offering underwriters an option to purchase additional shares from a selling stockholder.

The firm's $42.9 million in total revenues and $.41 loss per share for the second quarter both beat the average analyst estimates.

The New York-based multinational investment company will acquire Ancestry from current stakeholders Silver Lake, Spectrum Equity, Permira, and others.

The Wall Street Journal reports on the struggle to meet the demand for rapid COVID-19 testing.

The Newsroom reports New Zealand is using genomics to trace the origins of its new coronavirus outbreak.

In Nature this week: researchers in Canada sequence the genome of the black mustard plant Brassica nigra, and more.

According to Bloomberg, Moderna has a $1.5 billion vaccine deal with the US to provide 100 million doses.

The tumor microenvironment (TME) is comprised of an array of cell types, including immune and inflammatory cells, adipose cells, neuroendocrine cells, and cancer-associated fibroblasts. Additionally, blood and lymphatic vascular networks and extracellular matrix components create a diverse and multifaceted situation. Understanding how all of these elements interact requires the ability to distinguish individual cell types--something that is difficult to do using bulk cell approaches. Single cell gene expression analyses offer a high-resolution understanding of the TME.

Carrier screening to detect the presence of heritable genetic defects has been an important element of reproductive health strategies for over 50 years. Until recently, however, the practice has been restricted to a limited number of single-gene tests offered mainly to higher-risk individuals or populations based on race, ethnicity, or ancestry. But the landscape of carrier screening and its role in reproductive health are changing fast.