Postdoc in Physiologic Genomics

Organization: 
Saint Louis University
Job Location: 
Saint Louis University
Salary: 
Commensurate with experience
Benefits: 

Yes

Job Description: 

Dr. Daniel Warren in the Department of Biology at Saint Louis University is seeking to hire a postdoctoral fellow with expertise in bioinformatics, comparative genomics, and RNA-seq analysis tools, including TopHat and Cufflinks. The position will be funded by NSF for three years. Start date is flexible, but will not likely be until April 2013.

Dr. Warren's research is directed at understanding the physiological mechanisms underlying the extreme ability of painted turtles to survive complete oxygen deprivation (termed anoxia) for more than 3 months. This is a condition they experience while submerged in ice-covered ponds during winter. The postdoctoral fellow will carry out a series of RNA-seq experiments to examine the transcriptomic response of the turtle's heart during cold acclimation and anoxia. They will also investigate the effects of development (hatchling versus adult turtles).

Requirements: 

Candidates must hold a Ph.D. in computational biology, evolutionary genetics/genomics, molecular evolution or a related field. Experience in comparative genome-wide analyses, next-gen sequencing data, and bioinformatic programming are preferred. Programming skills in either perl, python, or other languages suitable for bioinformatic analyses are required. A starting salary will be commensurate with experience and benefits are included. Some experience using basic molecular biology is desirable, but not required.

Contact Information: 

Please contact Dr. Warren directly for additional details. dwarren4@slu.edu

Daniel E. Warren, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology Saint Louis University Macelwane Hall 228 Phone: 314.977.2043 Fax: 314.977.3658 Email: dwarren4@slu.edu https://sites.google.com/a/slu.edu/warren-lab/

About Our Organization: 

Saint Louis University is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer and encourages applications from women and minorities.